Junto Profile: Dianne Auger & the Ascension Health Network

Junto Profile: Dianne Auger & the Ascension Health Network

Those who actually manage and work within health systems are the ones who actually see the complete picture of the health tech revolution. They also are reading about these flashy new products, but unlike us they are also privy to the inner workings and struggles that getting a product successfully integrated into a health system requires. Revolutionizing our health system is not as easy as buying a bunch of product licenses and then handing out applications to patients, but actually involves a considerable amount of thought, training, IT integration, and program roll-out.One provider system that recently went through this experience is St. Vincent's Medical Center in Bridgeport, Connecticut.

Why A Silicon Valley Approach Can't Work for Health Tech

Why A Silicon Valley Approach Can't Work for Health Tech

Imagine if I told you that there was a pool of close to 600,000 individuals in New York City who were ripe for innovative health technology integration. You probably wouldn’t believe me and say that it sounded too good to be true. This said pool does in fact exist and can be found concentrated within the city’s public housing.

While entrepreneurs, governmental leaders, and healthcare officials constantly speak of innovation and disruption, there seems to be a major disconnect between these words and actual creativity. This large, untapped pool of individuals who fall under the New York City Housing Authority’s (NYCHA) umbrella is one example of the lack of creative and truly disruptive practices I see in today’s early stage ecosystem.

Junto Profile: Northeast Business Group on Health

Junto Profile: Northeast Business Group on Health

Countless individuals in the U.S. are fortunate to receive healthcare via their employers. There is no magical, one-size fits all program though for employers to provide for their employees. Instead, employers often shop around the private market seeking the right fit for their company. This leads to the weighing of a myriad of offerings against one another while leaders attempt to choose the best fit to create a complete healthcare experience for their employees.

Employers are increasingly realizing however that they do not need to travel down this road alone. The Northeast Business Group on Health (NEBGH) is an organization that is helping unite employers together to discuss plan coverage, and the actual needs of their employees, in hopes of improving the quality of healthcare for many Americans.

When Emotion Gets in the Way of Adoption: Overcoming the Fundamental Challenge for any Health Tech Company

When Emotion Gets in the Way of Adoption: Overcoming the Fundamental Challenge for any Health Tech Company

Recently, the Chief Product Officer of Celmatix, Angie Lee, gave an incredibly engaging speech at an event held by HealthTech Women called "Take Charge of Your Reproductive Health & Biological Clock". Focused on the advances in DNA and reproductive health technology, and how this information is empowering women to make smarter decisions about their health, this talk provided a platform for a topic that is often pushed to the side and behind closed doors.

Inspired by the speech she gave, we asked Angie to expand further on her thoughts about the importance of presenting data in an approachable manner to address infertility by authoring a guest article for us.  

 

Junto Profile: EverlyWell

Junto Profile: EverlyWell

In 2015, Julia Cheek founded a home health testing platform, EverlyWell, that has received acclaim from TechCrunch, CBS, Fast Company, and the Harvard Business School. Based in Austin, TX, EverlyWell has raised $5 million to date and is one of the fastest-growing consumer healthcare startups in recent history. They’ve reached millions in sales in just one year after launching in beta and in 2017 Julia was named the number one female entrepreneur to watch by CIO magazine for 2017.

With a mission of providing actionable insight regarding the biomarkers that appear on testing results so informed wellness decisions can be made, Everlywell has developed a convenient at-home process that has removed the layers of doctor appointments and difficult to understand results. Their recent partnership with Helix has also brought genomic testing to the platform, making them at the forefrongt of genomic and biomarker consumer testing.

An Interview with the Woman Who Coined "Femtech" - Ida Tin

An Interview with the Woman Who Coined "Femtech" - Ida Tin

At Junto Health we were lucky to have the chance to speak with the woman who coined the term “femtech”, Ida Tin, who is the CEO and co-founder of the female health application Clue.

Clue was founded in Berlin, Germany in 2013 when this technology movement first began to rise and has since grown its membership and reach. With a belief that “connected mobile technology is the future of female health”, Clue enables users to share information regarding menstrual cycles with partners, family, and friends. Ida took time to explain why this was an important aspect of the app’s design, and also how Clue is continuing to grow. 

Junto Profile: WinterLight Labs

Junto Profile: WinterLight Labs

A group in Toronto, Canada called WinterLight Labs is beginning to break down the barriers of diagnosis and progression tracking of Alzheimer's disease with their new detection program. Based on AI technology, they have developed a way to quantify speech and language patterns so that cognitive and mental diseases can be easily detected and monitored. We spoke with one of their co-founders, Liam Kaufman, about their research and how its commercialization has the potential to revolutionize Alzheimer’s detection and maintenance.

The Complex Relationship Between Health Tech & Medicaid

The Complex Relationship Between Health Tech & Medicaid

That is the number of individuals who received their health insurance coverage via either Medicaid or Medicare programs in 2015 according to the data compiled by the CDC and Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Let’s just repeat that number again- 105,692,900 Americans.

It was estimated that in 2015, there were 289,902,600 individuals with health insurance coverage. Approximately 39% of those individuals were receiving their coverage under public programs. This amounts to a significant percentage of the American population who are not being privately insured.  

Why is it then that many of today’s trending health tech companies are ignoring this 39% of covered Americans when developing their innovations?